MailEnable Standard Guide
Check and configure DNS settings
Installation > Post-installation configuration > Check and configure DNS settings

In order for remote mail servers to deliver email to the MailEnable server, the correct DNS entries need to be configured in the Domain Name Services (DNS) hosting the domain records.

The server should have a fixed IP address that is registered under the public DNS.  If the server does not have a static IP address (i.e. the IP address changes) in order to direct emails and domains to the server, a dynamic DNS provider (e.g. no-ip.com) will be required.  A dynamic DNS provider keeps track of the changing IP address and updates the DNS details accordingly. Companies that offer this service may charge a monthly fee, although there are some free services available. It is still possible to send email from MailEnable with a dynamic IP address, but unless the DNS is updated with the new IP address every time it changes, other mail servers will not be able to connect. Be aware that a number of mail servers will not accept email from the server if it does not have a static IP address, or if the server is using a cable/DSL connection.

Every domain registered on MailEnable should have mail exchanger (MX) records defined with your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or whoever is hosting the DNS.

Due to the vast array of combinations for DNS hosting and the number of vendor specific DNS implementations, consult your DNS provider for instructions or inform them of the servers published IP Address along with the domain names being hosted under MailEnable and request they configure the DNS accordingly.

If using MailEnable from a computer at your office or home, ensure that your Internet plan allows you to run a mail server. Some providers block incoming email to mail servers on their network, to avoid the possibility of spam abuse. They can also block all outgoing email that is not going through their mail server. If unsure, please contact your service provider. If MailEnable can send email correctly, but does not receive any, it is likely to be either the DNS settings, or your ISP has blocked incoming email to stop you running a mail server.

More information is available on configuring DNS in the MailEnable Knowledge Base (http://www.mailenable.com/kb).

The precise approach for configuring DNS depends on whether you are hosting your own DNS or whether an ISP or third party hosting the DNS. This section explains how you can configure your DNS if you are hosting your own DNS Server.

  1. Using the DNS Management software for the DNS Server, ensure that a DNS "A" (Host) record has been created for the mail server. This record type allows the host to be identified by a host name rather than IP Address. To validate whether the A record was registered correctly, use the ping utility. Attempt to ping the host using its host name. If this works, then the A record was registered correctly.
  2. Next, create an MX record that points to the A record. The way this is achieved depends on which DNS server/vendor being used
  3. When selecting a DNS for MailEnable to use, choose one that can resolve all domain names, which is not necessarily the DNS which is hosting the domain names. For example, if you host your domain names through a third party, it is unlikely that you would use their DNS IP address to resolve.

An example for registering MX records using Microsoft DNS Server is available at: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/library/ServerHelp/cb7a2363-0ed6-4c7c-87ba-7cc9592a8028.mspx